Mental Made Easy: Treating the Source VS. Pill Popping

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Mental Made Easy: Treating the Source VS. Pill Popping

By treating people in counselling over many years, and for many varied issues, I have always been quite surprised when a little digging, using a little intuition and curiosity, leads to the most unusual sources of traumatic mental or physical symptoms. Through the years, I’ve learned not to peg a symptom on a traditional cause, because it’s often not the right one! I have always been extremely thorough in investigating and treating a problem, not necessarily as a disorder, but as an issue that ALWAYS has a unique source, sometimes common to folk, sometimes not-and sometimes yet to be discovered. And sometimes not nearly as serious as the symptoms make it feel. Tracking and treating the source of an issue, to me, is SO key in helping a person, because THAT is the place to alleviate the issue. I can’t prescribe mainstream meds as a counsellor, so all I’ve ever done is recommend the natural stuff-and it’s SO effective!

Let’s take anxiety for example: why mess around with products to help the brain deal with the anxiety, affect brain chemistry and often produce nasty side effects, not to mention promoting addiction and abuse, when you can find the source, treat the source, kill the issue-and help the physical body along with a little natural stuff? I don’t get it.

We’ve become lazy. Chemically dependent and giving our power away to pill pushers.

Our ‘disorder’ and “Quick! Take a pill” culture has also encouraged people with mental issues to become fearful of who they are—and even lazy! The ‘disorder’ culture can be labelling at its dramatic worst, inducing fear in affected people, when the sources of their issues can be so simple. If folk understood their own troubles a little better, they could participate in their own remedial processes a little more, and learn the art of managing, even healing their troubles (with therapy guidance), rather than pop a pill and hope that troubles will just go away.

I personally, and ‘I’ as a representative of therapists, feel quite strongly that we have a responsibility to help clients or patients develop an understanding of their bodies (physical, emotional, mental and spiritual)—never mind their nutritional, environmental, social, and lifestyle values—in order to be able to have an idea of what’s going on when something goes wrong, and be able to start dealing with it.

A good parallel here is the understanding of what to do when you have flu. It’s currently, generally, a non-understanding.

We have a severe misuse of antibiotics in a pill-pushing culture: how many people actually know that they’re only for infections, NOT for viruses-and that specific antibiotics really work better to treat specific infections. At the first sign of flu, if you’re getting and taking an antibiotic, all you’re doing is wasting money, hurting your body and immune system—and NOT helping the flu virus at all!

We need to learn to ask questions.

Similarly, in the mental health field, we need to ask a LOT more questions too—and change our non-understanding of so-called disorders, our understanding of what pills actually do for us, our understanding of finding the source of an issue to really treat it—and our self-knowledge in terms of what issue we have, to be able to work the process WITH our therapist/counsellor/coach/doctor, instead of living in ignorance. It’s really giving our power away.

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